What You Need to Know About Engelhard, the Private Mint and Precious Metals Refinery

Engelhard was founded in 1902 in Newark, New Jersey. This company soon became the world’s largest precious metals refiner. In the mid-1970’s Engelhard made gold, silver, platinum & palladium bullion bars.

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Engelhard Prospector Started as a Gold Round

It wasn’t until the early 1980’s, that the company started to produce silver bullion rounds known as the Engelhard Prospector. They were struck from 1982 until 1987 when their production of precious metal ceased. 1987 was the second year of the American silver Eagle, which became vastly more popular

American Prospector gold and silver rounds were struck in 1/10, 1/4, 1/2, and 1 oz sizes. The fractional sized silver rounds were produced in smaller numbers and only in 1985. Understandably, they have higher premiums due to their rarity

As with other numismatics, the Prospector series has a key date.

The 1983 is far more difficult to find than the other coins in this short lived series. The rounds generally follow the silver bullion market, but the 1983 will typically cost three to four times as much as the other rounds in the series.

rare american coins

Silver Prospector with Original Reverse

Engelhard silver and gold rounds are far rarer than the American Silver Eagle, with only 700,000 silver rounds ever minted. The lowest Silver Eagle production year was 1996, when they made only 3,603,000

The Engelhard mint was the only private mint at the time who could say they rivalled federal mints from around the world. They are certainly worth the premium they don’t seem to get on their products.

The Engelhard trademark started as a capital E overlaying a world globe. They used this logo on all their products until sometime in 1984, when the Prospector reverse became a flying eagle. This allows collectors to buy both the 1984 with eagle reverse and with the original “E” reverse.

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Engelhard Prospector Second Reverse from 1984 On

The bars came in many sizes, but the most popular sizes are 1, 5, 10, and 100 oz denominations. Their silver bars have the famous “E” logo along with their name written out on both sides of the bar. All of the bars are clean cut and uniform. Silver bar production amounted to roughly 4,000,000 units.

Engelhard may be the most well-known name when it comes to silver bars, but they aren’t the only big name in the field. Other popular names include Sunshine Minting, Johnson Matthey, Pamp Suisse, and Silvertowne. Each of these companies has been around for many years and enjoys a reputation similar to Engelhard.

Probably, the best place to buy an Engelhard silver bar or round is on the internet. You will be able to choose from the lowest mark ups, and may even find versions of the bar that you didn’t even know existed before. There are many, many variations of their silver bars.

Check out other informative articles on this website using the Search, Recent Articles, or Category features on the upper right side of this page.

If you are interested in investing in silver or gold products, check out GoldSilver.com, or AmagiMetals.com.                               

If you are interested in buying gold or silver bullion at the lowest price, check out BullionVault.

If you are interested in learning more about rare American coin, or foreign coin collecting and investing see NumisMaster from Krause Publications.

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Just How Rare and Collectible Are the US Trade Dollar Coins?

Trade dollars were despised at home and loved in China. They were 4 grams heavier than either the Liberty Seated or Morgan silver dollars used for domestic trade. These silver dollars were very short lived, and only used from 1873 to 1878.

When silver prices crashed in 1876, the Trade Dollar flooded the American economy. They had an actual value of $.80 even though their face value was a dollar. They were worth their weight in silver bullion, not the dollar stated on the reverse. In July of 1876 Congress withdrew its legal tender status.

They offer the chance to buy truly rare American coins for reasonable prices.

Three significant factors contribute to the rarity of collector grade Trade Dollars.

  1. Original mintage: Mintages were small compared to most US silver coins.
  2. Relatively few of the coins actually remained in the United States. Huge quantities of them were melted for their silver value in China and India. It’s believed that half the 1878-CC mintage was melted.
  3. Chop marks: Many Trade Dollars were counter stamped in the Orient with merchant acceptance as payment. Many others were abrasively cleaned. Both disqualify the coin from being graded.
rare american coins

1878 Trade Dollar

Business strikes are dated from 1873 to 1878 and produced in Philadelphia, San Francisco and Carson City. The business strikes minted from 1873 to 1878 comprise 6 Carson City issues, 6 San Francisco issues, and just 5 Philadelphia Mint coins. This results in only 17 different date/mint mark combination.

Mintage of over a million coins is relatively rare for the Trade dollar. The highest mintage was the 1877-S with 9,519,000 struck, then 1876-S taking second place with 5,227,000 and the 1875-S taking third place with 4,487,000 examples. Fourth place is the 1878-S with 4,162,000 coins.

As you can see, only the above dates of 1875-S, 1876-S, 1877-S and 1878-S would qualify as “relatively common” and even these are still difficult to find in Mint State. All the other date/mint marks are scarce, rare, extremely rare or unknown in Mint State.

Trade dollars have somewhat more collector interest than Seated Liberty dollars, because they have at least some chance of completing a full date/mint mark series. None would be considered an unobtainable rarity. The most elusive coin of the group is the 1878-CC, which also happens to be the lowest mintage of the series.

If you ignore the 1884 and 1885 limited proof issues, there might be a chance of a complete series collection. There were only 5 total 1885 proofs struck. The 1885 trade dollar has all of the elements of intrigue and desirability of the more famous 1804 Draped Bust silver dollar.

rare american coins

1878 Trade Dollar Proof

Disregarding 1884 and 1885, proof versions of the business strike Trade Dollars were produced in very limited numbers for collectors. There wasn’t much collector interest, and little attempt was made by the mint to generate collector interest in them.

If a collector wished to retain an example, he would purchase a proof from the mint. Proof Trade Dollar coins were issued for collectors from 1873 to 1883. The high mint state versions are usually only available as proofs.

Trade dollars never got hoarded the way Morgan and Peace dollars have. In other words, there isn’t much chance of future discoveries of someone’s secret stash.

Business strikes are often very rare in Mint State, but relatively obtainable in circulated grades, even AU. In higher mint state grades, business strike versions of the Trade Dollars are among the ultimate rare American coins.

Check out other informative articles on this website using the Search, Recent Articles, or Category features on the upper right side of this page.

If you are interested in investing in silver or gold products, check out GoldSilver.com, or AmagiMetals.com.                               

If you are interested in buying gold or silver bullion at the lowest price, check out BullionVault.

If you are interested in learning more about rare American coin, or foreign coin collecting and investing see NumisMaster from Krause Publications.

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Oil Price Decrease Is Part of a Global Economic Problem, a 2010 Mike Maloney Prediction

Here is another great Mike Maloney video, where he explains how our monetary system works to a Russian audience, and the fall of world oil prices back in 2010. Mike also explains fractional reserve lending, where there is more debt than currency available to pay for it.

Under our current monetary system, all currency is borrowed into existence, creating a debt based monetary system. Our currency supply has been collapsing since 2012.

Check out other informative articles on this website using the Search, Recent Articles, or Category features on the upper right side of this page.

If you are interested in investing in silver or gold products, check out GoldSilver.com, or AmagiMetals.com.                               

If you are interested in buying gold or silver bullion at the lowest price, check out BullionVault.

If you are interested in learning more about rare American coin, or foreign coin collecting and investing see NumisMaster from Krause Publications.

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Which Walking Liberty Half Dollar Collecting Strategy Is Best for You?

Walking Liberty half dollars are one of the most beautiful of American coins. They age gracefully, and are a far less expensive to collect than the more popular Morgan silver dollar

Their key date 1921-S, in MS-65 condition will sell for around $100,000. The 1893-S Morgan in MS-65 condition will bring nearly $700,000. In MS-60 they are about $20,000 compared to the 1893-S for $130,000.

Walking Liberty are the most elegant of American half dollars.

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Mint too busy making 1921 Morgans to make anything else

The Walking Liberty isn’t quite the same bargain in AU however. The 1921-S goes for around $7,000 and the 1893-S Morgan goes for around $21,000. Instead of a 1 to 7 ratio in the MS categories, it’s only a 1 to 3 ratio in AU.

As you get into the late date Walkers the cost of mint state coins goes down considerably. Mint state examples are plentiful and cheap after 1935.

A complete date/mint set of MS-65 Walking Liberties would cost somewhere in the half million dollar range. So, the entire collection would cost less than one 1893-S Morgan in MS-65 condition.

I see four fundamental strategies for collecting Walking Liberties:

  1. US half dollar type set
  2. Walking Liberty year set
  3. Walking Liberty complete date/mint set
  4. Walking Liberty proof set

1. The US half dollar short, type set could include each of the following:

  • Flowing Hair half
  • Draped Bust half
  • Capped bust
  • Seated Liberty half
  • Barber half
  • Walking Liberty
  • Franklin
  • Kennedy

If you’re willing to accept lower mint state for the Flowing Hair and Draped Bust designs, this collection could be obtained for around $150,000.

  1. The Walking Liberty year set would contain 25 coins for an example of one from each year this issue was minted. An example of this would be:
  • 1916-P to 1921-P
  • 1923-S
  • 1927-S
  • 1928-S
  • 1929-D
  • 1933-S
  • 1934-P to 1947-P

This strategy allows you to assemble each year of issue in mint condition without breaking the bank. It would be acceptable to have the rare dates in MS-64 alongside the common dates in MS-65. You’re looking at something under $40,000 for a collection like this.

  1. A complete date/mint set would require 65 coins. A set like this could also use MS-65 examples for the common later date coins and MS-64 for the more expensive dates. Depending how you organize a collection like this, it might cost around $350,000 to complete. 

    rare american coins

    1936 Proof Walking Liberty

  2. Here’s the surprise. If you go for a proof set, there are only 7 coins minted as proofs for this series. Proofs are surprisingly inexpensive and even more beautiful than the circulation issue. There is only one key date in the proof series, and that’s 1936. A set of PF-65 Walking Liberty coins will cost just under $10,000.

I price mint state coins here because the mint state coins have the most demand and collector value. They will retain their prices better and increase more than their circulated versions.

rare american coins

Walking Liberty Design High Points

As discussed in my article on Pivotal Grading Points, the greatest profit potential is to buy the coin just under the pivotal grade. That is often, but not always MS-64.

If you were to accept MS-64 as your grade standard, you could complete these set examples for considerably less money than described here. As demonstrated above a complete set is considerably less expensive than a complete date/mint Morgan set.

Check out other informative articles on this website using the Search, Recent Articles, or Category features on the upper right side of this page.

If you are interested in investing in silver or gold products, check out GoldSilver.com, or AmagiMetals.com.                               

If you are interested in buying gold or silver bullion at the lowest price, check out BullionVault.

If you are interested in learning more about rare American coin, or foreign coin collecting and investing see NumisMaster from Krause Publications.

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Why Are True Slider, Rare American Coins Considered Circulated?

It intrigues me that original type “slider” silver dollars are considered by professional graders and most coin collectors to be circulated coins. It seems to me that the term slider has taken on a broader meaning than first intended.

The term slider originated as a mint state collector coin that was placed in a narrow height wooden drawer which had holes bored into it for the purpose of holding a collector’s coins. There was a slight amount of extra space where the coin could wiggle as the drawer was opened and closed.

The wear on a slider didn’t come from the mint.

rare american coins

A Silver Dollar Slider

Traces of abrasion on the coin wore off slight amounts of mint luster. The fact that there was some surface wear on the coin made it no longer in mint state condition. Thus the word slider was “coined” to describe this phenomenon.

I fully agree that these traces of wear on the face of the silver dollar constitute a condition which isn’t how it arrived from the mint. However, I take exception to calling it circulated. This obviously isn’t circulation wear, because the coin was never circulated.

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Another Silver Dollar Slider

I think referring to a slider as circulated is doing it a gross injustice. I think slider coins should have their own grading category, even if it is called “slider”. These orphan coins don’t belong in the Mint State category, and neither do they belong in the circulated category.

Referring to a slider as “about uncirculated” is a totally inaccurate description for it. If the silver dollar is truly a slider, by the original definition, it won’t look almost uncirculated. If it does look almost uncirculated, it isn’t a slider.

If these coins can’t have their own grading category, I think they should be called “mint state” with a note regarding the trace amount of slide wear on the coin. Slide wear doesn’t look like circulation wear, even in minor amounts, yet the coin is relegated to circulated when it comes to grading.

rare american coins

Silver Dollar Slider Pancakes

These coins have the reputation as being “passed off” by unscrupulous coin dealers as mint state. Are they really cheating a buyer by saying they’re mint state? After all, they are mint state coins with the slightest high point rub marks, not handling wear acquired during business transactions.

The rub marks on these coins originate from wood cases of past times, and coin flips in more modern times. Their wear results from ignorance of their collectors, past and present, not the result of carelessness from a commercial transaction, or casino use. Am I totally missing something here?

Check out other informative articles on this website using the Search, Recent Articles, or Category features on the upper right side of this page.

If you are interested in investing in silver or gold products, check out GoldSilver.com, or AmagiMetals.com.                               

If you are interested in buying gold or silver bullion at the lowest price, check out BullionVault.

If you are interested in learning more about rare American coin, or foreign coin collecting and investing see NumisMaster from Krause Publications.

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Eisenhower Silver Dollars, Last of the Traditional Silver Dollar Type Coins

Dwight Eisenhower proved to be a successful leader in World War II, which led to the surrender of the Germans. He later was pursued by both parties for president. He won the 1952 election and again in 1956 as a Republican, and was known as an inspirational leader.

I personally don’t care much for Eisenhower silver dollars. I include them here because they were the last of the 1 ounce silver dollar sized coins America ever produced, and a few even contained some silver.

The 60’s were a time of change, and Congress thought Americans would like more pocket change in addition to social change. Thus the Ike dollar.

The decade of the 1960’s was a time of turmoil and change for the US. Congress determined it wasn’t practical to use silver in circulation coinage any longer. The transition to cupronickel clad coins began in 1965.

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Nice Business Strike Ike

From 1965 to 1969, silver clad copper which formed a 40% silver content was used. Then in 1970, cupronickel replaced silver in all fractional silver coinage. The new coins needed to be accepted by vending machines, the public, and be cost effective to produce.

A huge driving factor in eliminating silver in US coinage was that silver consumption was outpacing production. There was a concern that at the current rate of consumption, the Treasury’s supply of silver would be exhausted by 1969. Silver was simply becoming too scarce for continued large scale use in coins.

Dwight Eisenhower died in 1969, and the Joint Commission on Coinage decided to honor him with a silver dollar sized coin. On December 31st, 1970, President Nixon approved the production of the Eisenhower silver dollar coin. The Eisenhower dollar was produced from 1971 through 1978.

Since no silver dollar sized coin had been produced since 1935, mint employees at all 3 branches were unfamiliar with striking coins that large. Denver got some practice with the 1964 Peace dollar, but Americans never got to see the result of their efforts.

rare american coins

Nice Ike Reverse Strike

San Francisco was the only mint to strike Eisenhower silver dollars with any actual silver in them. San Francisco struck both silver dollars containing silver and the cupronickel versions.

Proof coin production was moved to San Francisco in 1968. The San Francisco Mint struck Ikes containing 40% silver as proofs, and a few special “collector” uncirculated business strikes. None of the circulation strike Eisenhower silver dollars from any mint contained silver. All circulation strikes were cupronickel clad over a copper core.

If you can see a copper core along the rim of the coin, it isn’t silver. If there is no copper visible on the rim, it is the collector edition 40% silver strike.

Even the “silver” versions were a compromise. They were .800 silver clad over a .210 silver/copper core. That gave the coin as a whole, 40% silver content.

rare american coins

1974 Ike Proof

Mint proof sets didn’t necessarily have coins containing any silver either. Proof mintage exceeded 1 million coins, and up to 4 million coins every year of production. Business strikes approached a staggering 175 million coins in 1972. With these mintage figures, the lack of silver content, and low production quality, there is nothing rare or valuable about these coins.

The Eisenhower silver dollar, like the one dollar coins that followed was a package of compromise that completely failed as a circulating coin. The design was uninspired and production quality very low. No wonder there is so little collector interest in it.

Unfortunately as a young person, I saved as many of these coins as I could. I thought all silver dollars were alike. They would someday become valuable, and pay me back handsomely. I wish I’d collected Morgans in the 1970’s instead. At least they did gain considerable value.

Like the 1964 Kennedy half dollar, it is impossible to find any coin in a lower circulated grade than AU. The reason for their lack of circulation was completely different, however.

Check out other informative articles on this website using the Search, Recent Articles, or Category features on the upper right side of this page.

If you are interested in investing in silver or gold products, check out GoldSilver.com, or AmagiMetals.com.                               

If you are interested in buying gold or silver bullion at the lowest price, check out BullionVault.

If you are interested in learning more about rare American coin, or foreign coin collecting and investing see NumisMaster from Krause Publications.

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1900 Lafayette, America’s First Commemorative Silver Dollar

The Lafayette commemorative silver dollar was not only America’s first commemorative silver dollar, but the first coin to have a portrait of our first president on it. This also was the only silver dollar commemorative coin minted until 1983.

These coins dated 1900 were actually struck on December 14th, 1899, which was the 100th anniversary of George Washington’s death. This was technically in violation of the Mint Act of 1873 which required coinage to display the actual year of mintage as the date. 50,000 coins were minted in one day to be sold as fund raising souvenirs.

So, who was Lafayette, and why were they commemorating him with a silver dollar?

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Marquis de Lafayette

Marquis de Lafayette was born in 1757 to French nobility. He went to college, and then joined the French Army in 1771. In 1777 he became interested in the American Revolution, so he came over to offer his services.

Congress gave him a commission of Major General in the new Continental Army. He soon became good friends with George Washington, and influenced the French to join the Americans in an alliance against the British.

Lafayette’s involvement in the American Revolution swung the war effort in the American’s favor. This led to the British surrender in 1781.

The year 1900 was the year for the Paris Exposition, a monumental event for the time. All of France was celebrating and the US decided to join the party. The US planned on donating a large statue of General Lafayette on his horse, sculpted by Paul Bartlett.

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Lafayette Statue

This coin was minted to help raise funds for this impressive statue. The cost was estimated at $100,000. Therefore 50,000 coins were produced to be sold at $2 apiece to defray the cost.

The Mint’s own Charles Barber designed this silver dollar with the pair of heads of Washington and Lafayette on the obverse and Bartlett’s early sketch of the statue on the reverse.

School children contributed their pennies to help meet the statue’s cost. In honor of their efforts, an inscription was added to the reverse which states “ERECTED BY THE YOUTH OF THE UNITED STATES IN HONOR OF GEN. LAFAYETTE”.

The monument was unveiled on July 4th, 1900 in Paris for the Exposition.

rare american coins

1900 Lafayette Silver Dollar

Of the 50,000 Lafayette silver dollars produced, only around 36,000 were actually sold. The other 14,000 coins stayed in bank vaults until they were melted sometime before 1945.

Lafayette commemorative silver dollars are mostly found in circulated condition, as the American public didn’t see them as particularly special at the time. AU+ examples are plentiful, but truly mint state specimens are really rare American coins.

Unfortunately, these coins are typically poorly struck, with dull luster and many bag marks. The 1900 Lafayette silver dollar is one of the rarest commemorative coins in MS-65 and higher condition.

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Mike Maloney Observations on the Current US Economy

Here are two Mike Maloney videos taken at the same event with some observations on the current state of the US economy. As always, I think Mike Maloney videos are very intellectual and fact based.

In my opinion, American gold coin value and value of all silver will skyrocket sometime in this decade. That gives you some time to acquire your share, whether it’s in the form of gold or silver bullion or gold and silver coins. Check out GoldSilver.com on the right side of this page.

How savers are punished in today’s monetary environment

Could the USA default on its debt?

Check out other informative articles on this website using the Search, Recent Articles, or Category features on the upper right side of this page.

If you are interested in investing in silver or gold products, check out GoldSilver.com, or AmagiMetals.com.                               

If you are interested in buying gold or silver bullion at the lowest price, check out BullionVault.

If you are interested in learning more about rare American coin, or foreign coin collecting and investing see NumisMaster from Krause Publications.

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The Pivotal Grading Point of Rare American Coins

The pivotal grading point of a rare coin is defined as the MS grade where the next higher grade is worth more than double the grade just below it. This is essential information for the rare American coin investor as well as collector.

Generally, two conditions will be present for a pivotal point grade. Learn to identify pivotal grading points and use this information to your advantage.

First, the third party grading service population report number of the higher grade must be less than 50% of the lower grade coin. If you review population reports, this is almost universally true.

Second, there will be at least a 100% price increase between the lower grade and the higher grade. Often, there is considerably more than double the price increase.

Pricing information for this article is based on the CDN Greysheet listings for Morgan and Peace dollars.

There is virtually always more than one pivotal grade point for a semi-key date mint state coin. It’s the combination of population and price that determines the initial and secondary pivotal point.

The secondary pivotal grading point usually has a more dramatic price increase than the initial. There are a few exceptions to this rule. The 1893-S Morgan is one of them. This is probably due to their already stratospheric prices.

The higher the coin grade, the more pivotal it becomes.

rare american coins

1893-S MS Morgan

Generally speaking, the majority of Morgan and Peace silver dollars have their initial pivotal grade points at MS-65 and a secondary at MS-66.

The really common date Morgan and Peace dollars will have their pivotal point at MS-66 instead of MS-65. For example, the 1922 Peace silver dollar will initially pivot at MS-66 and again at MS-67.

The 1921 Morgan dollar will pivot initially at MS-65, with a secondary pivot at MS-66 and a tertiary pivot at MS 67. This very common coin is relatively uncommon in higher mint states.

Perhaps around 25% of Morgans are at MS-64 initially. Semi-common Morgan and Peace dates pivot at MS-64 or MS-65. The secondary is often between MS-65 and MS-66.

If you look at a price guide, you’ll notice the rarer the date, the lower grade the initial pivotal point it will have, and it may only have one at the lowest mint state grade. This is due to rarity in all grades, circulated and uncirculated.

rare american coins

1889-CC MS Morgan

1893-S Morgan dollar prices increase substantially throughout its grading scale, but when you hit MS-60 the price jumps to 6 times the price of the AU-58. Then it pivots again at MS-65, but his time the secondary pivot point isn’t greater than the primary.

The difference in price between every pivot point in the mint state coin grades will be substantial, usually several thousands of dollars. To find the exact pivotal grade point, look on current price charts to determine where it is and what the exact price difference is.

What does this mean to you as an investor? Generally speaking, the greatest gains will be made for the grade just below the initial pivotal point. Again, generally speaking, the MS-64 Morgan has the greatest potential for price increases. Consult current price guides for specific information.

The grade right below the pivotal grade has a far larger market than the pivotal grade, especially in a down market. That’s because, most collectors and many investors are happy to pay a whole lot less for almost as good.

Check out other informative articles on this website using the Search, Recent Articles, or Category features on the upper right side of this page.

If you are interested in investing in silver or gold products, check out GoldSilver.com, or AmagiMetals.com.                               

If you are interested in buying gold or silver bullion at the lowest price, check out BullionVault.

If you are interested in learning more about rare American coin, or foreign coin collecting and investing see NumisMaster from Krause Publications.

 

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Rare American Coins and Morgan Dollar Branch Mint Proofs

There is a widespread belief that Philadelphia is the only US mint to produce proof Morgan silver dollars. This is generally true, but the other 3 mints occasionally struck proofs as well. These coins were struck with the extra pressure, from highly polished dies, one at a time and handled with extra care.

All the dies for Morgan and Peace silver dollars were made in Philadelphia. The final steps of basining and polishing were performed when the dies arrived at the respective branches.

There is a lot of controversy and conjecture around Branch mint proof coins.

Because of the low mintage numbers of branch mint proofs, and how infrequently they were struck, it’s commonly believed the branch mint proof dies were just modifications of the business dies. The largest known branch mint proof production amounts to 24 examples.

1921-S ProofThere is a lot of controversy and conjecture around these coins. Determining positively that a coin is indeed a branch mint proof is difficult. These examples usually don’t exhibit the square rims or bold design details of the Philadelphia proof silver dollars.

Employees of the three mint branches weren’t experienced in striking proof quality coins. Therefore these coins didn’t get the attention to detail the Philadelphia versions got.

Proof coins from the 3 branches are hard to distinguish from exceptional prooflike business strikes. That means they must be authenticated by an expert in the field.

The late Walter Breen was considered to be the ultimate authority on the subject. He had been authenticating these coins since 1963, and was possibly the only person expert enough to authenticate coins as proofs originating from a branch mint.

Montana coin dealer, Wayne Miller may be a close second to Walter Breen in this field. I’m not sure whom PCGS or NGC uses for this purpose.

Authentication starts with mint records indicating that the respective branch had produced proof coins in a given year. The existence of the coin must be well documented to begin with.

The well documented dates, proof coins were struck at branch mints are:

• 1879-O, 12 pieces, of which 4 are known to exist.
• 1883-O, 12 pieces, of which 2 are known to exist.
• 1893-CC, 12 pieces, of which 4 are known to exist.
• 1921-S, 24 pieces, of which 5 are known to exist.

There are other dates that exhibit definite proof qualities, such as the 1887-O, 1883-CC, 1884-CC and 1895-O, but not adequate mint records.

These examples are more than simply prooflike. Legitimate differing opinions exist among several leading and knowledgeable experts as to whether these are genuine proof coins produced at the mint branch or simply specimen type coins.

rare american coins

A Rare and Lovely 1879-O Proof Morgan Dollar

The well documented dates are known as class I proofs produced by the branch mints. The 1879-O is probably the best known, because it commemorated the reopening of the New Orleans mint, closed since 1861.

The 1893-CC was struck for the closing of the Carson City Mint. The 1921’s were struck for coin dealers Farran Zerbe and Henry Chapman. I can’t find any commemorative reason for the production of the 1883-O version however.

Check out other informative articles on this website using the Search, Recent Articles, or Category features on the upper right side of this page.

If you are interested in investing in silver or gold products, check out GoldSilver.com, or AmagiMetals.com.                               

If you are interested in buying gold or silver bullion at the lowest price, check out BullionVault.

If you are interested in learning more about rare American coin, or foreign coin collecting and investing see NumisMaster from Krause Publications.

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